Contests by The Voluntaryist

What Voluntaryism Means To You

Many of you have written articles on “How You Became a Voluntaryist.” While this is very important and interesting we would also like to find out “What Voluntaryism Means to You.” Consequently, we are soliciting articles on this latter topic.

Your essay can be as long or as short as you choose it to be. We suggest it include your personal definition of voluntaryism, and at least one concrete example of how you have applied voluntaryist principles in your day-to-day life. Has voluntaryism influenced your understanding of property rights in dealing with business associates, family members or friends? Has voluntaryism helped you make decisions on how to conduct your life, what type of work you engage in, how you educate your children, and/or how you interact with people in general? Essays will be judged on their conciseness, clarity, originality, and the degree of human interest they generate.

Articles are to be submitted via email to editor@voluntaryist.com. Mark the subject line: What Voluntaryism Means to Me

Submissions must be received by June 15th, 2019. Carl Watner, Julie Watner, and Dave Scotese will be judges. No winner will be announced if the judges are not sufficiently satisfied with any of the submissions. So long as a winner is selected, all submissions become the property of voluntaryist.com and will be considered eligible for publication in the hardcopy newsletter and the online site.

The winner will receive the equivalent of 10 ounces of .999 silver, either in silver coin or its value via paypal dollars based on the spot price of silver on June 15th, 2019. The runner-up, if one is selected, will receive the equivalent of 5 ounces of silver or its dollar value. Means of payment will be determined by the judges.

Direct any questions to Carl Watner at editor@voluntaryist.com


Taxation Is Theft

Our first essay contest asked writers for the best way to explain that taxation is theft. The winning entry was Sophisticated Slavery, by Marco den Ouden.  Other entries can be found in our “Taxation is Theft” section.